Megatrends: Flexible working

This report looks at recent trends in flexible working, and since we have to set boundaries around the analysis, we’ve concentrated on trends in when and where work is done

Flexible working is not easily defined. This is because it is often seen by what it isn’t – not the 9-to-5, not the daily commute to a central workplace – as opposed to by what it is. Nevertheless, people think they know it when they see it, and as a result certain working patterns or ways of working, such as flexi-time, working part-time hours, or working from home are regarded as types of 'flexible working'. This report looks at recent trends in flexible working, and since we have to set boundaries around the analysis, we’ve concentrated on trends in when and where work is done.

While this report is based on the UK, the findings and issues identified are similar to those found in Ireland especially in terms of uptake. 

Overall, the report suggests that while many people already benefit from flexible working, a significant proportion of the workforce are not being given the option to work flexibly. Ultimately, informing managers of the many benefits of flexible working, and training them on how to manage flexible workers, is the most effective way of significantly increasing the quantity and quality of flexible working.

Download the report below:

Top